How I planned my career for my return to work

How I planned my career for my return to work
A few years ago I started planning to have a baby. My goals were probably a little more unconventional than those of most young women. I concentrated on ensuring I would be of such value to the company they would welcome my request for flexibility when I returned to work. I worked hard and involved myself in every part of the business, even outside my skill set. I formed strong relationships with everyone in the group, from entry level to local senior management, and I built my global management relationships. I worked collaboratively with all departments to create an interdependent working style with me. I strived for promotions and won salary increases based on performance, so that when I came back in a job share role, a pro rata salary would be sufficient to support my family. I built strong networks externally and shared them with my employer, contributing to raising our CSR score by 30% in 12 months. I invested in upskilling and became a vocational education trainer to supplement my income should that be necessary (having first established that there was plenty of casual and part time work in the training industry). Think I’m crazy? One in five mothers report that their roles were made redundant or their departments restructured while they were on maternity leave. The Australian Human Rights Commission reports that 49% of mothers experience discrimination in the workplace at some point. Discrimination in the form of loss of opportunities for further training and career advancement, reduction in pay and conditions, as well as redundancy and job loss, are prevalent. My newsfeed is flooded with...

Meet the new workforce

Meet the new workforce
The question “What do you do” has become one of the most difficult questions I ever have to answer these days. And it’s not because I’m not doing anything. It’s because I do too much. I am a Brand Consultant/Entrepreneur/Author, someone you would call a Slashie – a new generation on the rise that’s not defined by a singular job title, but by our skill sets, interests and passion. Like a growing number of my peers, I am holding down more than one job – not because I have to, but because I want to. This generation is ditching the 9-5 not because we lack discipline and commitment, but because our ambition and drive urges us to seek more challenges. We are forgoing traditional stable career paths once deemed desirable not because we just want to be different, but because we are determined to forge our own paths and create our own careers. We are educated, confident and hungry to get ahead. Armed with rapidly advancing technology, we are putting in more hard work, juggling more responsibilities and sometimes enjoying less sleep, but are happily reaping the rewards of being more fulfilled, productive and purposeful. We are equipped with multidisciplinary skills from our corporate and entrepreneurial  work that will see us succeeding in the 21st century. The cross-fertilization of skills makes us extremely useful and resourceful in the competitive and ever evolving world of business. Employers are looking for top talents that can bring cut-through, entrepreneurial and innovative thinking to progress their business and keep them ahead of the curve. Investors are looking for entrepreneurs with corporate maturity, who...