5 common mistakes of job share partners

5 common mistakes of job share partners
Job share means two people sharing one role. It is one of the most effective flexible working options as it allows employees to have a meaningful career whilst increasing productivity for an organisation. Yet job share is often created reactively, for example when two women are coming back from maternity leave at similar times. Companies don’t necessarily take the time to ensure the partners are a good match and their arrangement is well structured. This article summarises the most common mistakes Gemini3 has seen through its multiple interviews and meetings with job share partners and companies supporting job share. Match for convenience Many job share arrangements are created reactively and for convenience. One of the common mistakes is when job share partners do not take the time to get to know each other prior to starting their arrangement. Using unbiased psychometric tools to understand each individual’s strengths and weaknesses can make the difference between a successful and unsuccessful partnership.  Through our research Gemini3 has uncovered the key attributes to not only create an effective pair but also to increase productivity of the role. Don’t have face to face hand-over time Face to face time is a golden rule when it comes to job share. It is highly important for the partners to have at least an hour to meet face to face and share projects but also challenges they face. Technology can play a great role in creating effective communication between the partners but it will never replace face to face connection. Don’t have a clear job share plan Most job share partners start their arrangement without taking the...

5 reasons to Job Share

5 reasons to Job Share
Job share means two people sharing one role. The two employees not only share the same performance goals but also the same reporting lines. Job share is a flexible working option which provides great benefits other flexible options do not offer. Job share is an underutilised arrangement often put in the “too hard basket”. The following five reasons to job share showcase how its benefits easily overcome its barriers. Offers real flexibility Job share partners typically work three days each and have one day of hand over. One of the biggest advantages of job share is that the work continues while you are away. Unlike many part time, you do not need to spend additional time catching up when you return to work. Opens flexible senior roles The more senior the role, the harder it is to make it part time as the employee needs to be continuously present and often manage full time employees. Job share is the only arrangement allowing senior roles to have full time continuity and offering career development opportunities for employees. Gives opportunity to learn and share No other flexible options offer the ability to create a diverse partnership. When companies take the time to match job share partners based on their complementary skills set and diversity of thinking, it allows both employees to learn and grow together by sharing ideas and challenges. Increases productivity of roles Job share has been proven to increase the productivity of a role by 30%*. This is possible by matching complementary skills and having two brains thinking differently about the challenges. Job share partners are also more focused...

Men also want to job share

Men also want to job share
Job share was born in the late 1970s, yet today, more than three decades later, it is still associated with women with caring responsibilities. But our workforce is changing rapidly and flexibility is needed not only for women, but also for men. This was shown clearly in a survey conducted by Gemini3 with Research Now; the results revealed that 76% of men were interested in job share – almost equal with women (77%). Why men want job share? Men are looking to job share for different reasons than women. Lifestyle choice is reason No. 1- to allow more time to spend with family, give to the community or practice a hobby. Transition to retirement comes in second place for both men and women. Both are interested in job share to ease into retirement, but based on Australian Bureau of Statistics figures, women will need it sooner than men. Until recently, the average retirement age was 50 for women vs 58.9 for men, but interestingly, this gap has been narrowing. In the past five years the average retirement age was 59.6 for women vs 63.3 for men. Entrepreneurial pursuit is the No. 3 reason to job share for men, and the younger the man, the more important this is. Companies should not underestimate the number of employees, especially men, who are looking at pursuing their own businesses. At 11% of male respondents, this represents over half a million men in Australia. Caring for children comes in at No. 4, with 9% of men choosing it as their primary reason to job share. This is a high number considering only 0.6%...

Job Share a solution to retaining older talented workers

In recent years, the need for job flexibility has gained a lot of media attention. Most of this attention has focused on flexibility for mothers returning to work, so in the current work force, job share is mainly utilised to support women with care responsibilities. Until now, the need for job flexibility for older workers to accommodate a better transition to retirement hasn’t received much consideration. This means that when talented older workers retire, Australian corporations are faced with the sudden loss of their skills. Based on ABS, there are close to one million Australians aged 45-64 who are retired but who could potentially still contribute to our workforce1. One issue is the lack of senior part-time roles in the market. Today, part-time roles represent 36.9% of the Australian market but only 1.2% of these are management roles2. Job share can play a great part in giving talented older workers the flexibility they need so companies can retain them in roles where their skills and knowledge can be utilised and shared across the business. Transition to retirement is the #2 reason to consider job share In a survey conducted by Gemini3 with Research Now, 26% of respondents chose transition to retirement as their main reason to consider job share3. This represents 1.3 million employees Australian corporations could retain for longer by supporting job share arrangements. The survey also highlighted that the more senior the employee, the more interested they would be in job share. This reaffirmed job share being a solution to retaining senior and high performer employees. How companies can drive job share with older workers Include job...

Part time isn’t a substitute for Job Share

Part time isn’t a substitute for Job Share
How often have you meet a working mum who works in the corporate world part time and yet they’re on emails and calls on their days off? I’ve experienced the part time trap and learnt the hard way that part time isn’t a substitute for job share. What is the difference between part time and job share? Job Design A part time role should have responsibilities that can be achieved in part time hours. It should be positions in the organisation that can survive without the person being required to work full time. Job share is two people working part time hours to fore fill one full time job. The demands of the job means it needs to deliver the requirements of the role in 38 hours a week. Be careful when returning to work asking for part time hours. Does that mean your role, responsibilities and deadlines will change accordingly? The answer is that they should or the role should be job share rather then part time. Sharing the role and responsibilities In a part time role one person is responsible to complete the job. When the employee is not in the office the work stops until he/she returns. In a job share arrangement there are two people sharing the responsibilities of one job, which is of a huge benefit to the employee and the employers. When I’m on my day off I can totally switch off because I know my job share partner is on it. My employer knows there is always someone in the office covering the work and the company is getting two brains for...