Men also want to job share

Men also want to job share

Job share was born in the late 1970s, yet today, more than three decades later, it is still associated with women with caring responsibilities. But our workforce is changing rapidly and flexibility is needed not only for women, but also for men. This was shown clearly in a survey conducted by Gemini3 with Research Now; the results revealed that 76% of men were interested in job share – almost equal with women (77%).

Read more

Job Share a solution to retaining older talented workers

In recent years, the need for job flexibility has gained a lot of media attention. Most of this attention has focused on flexibility for mothers returning to work, so in the current work force, job share is mainly utilised to support women with care responsibilities.

Read more

Part time isn’t a substitute for Job Share

Part time isn’t a substitute for Job Share

How often have you meet a working mum who works in the corporate world part time and yet they’re on emails and calls on their days off? I’ve experienced the part time trap and learnt the hard way that part time isn’t a substitute for job share. What is the difference between part time and job share? Job Design A part time role should have responsibilities that can be achieved in part time hours. It should be positions in the organisation that can survive without the person being required to work full time. Job share is two people working part time hours to fore fill one full time job. The demands of the job means it needs to deliver the requirements of the role in 38 hours a week. Be careful when returning to work asking for part time hours. Does that mean your role, responsibilities and deadlines will change accordingly? The answer is that they should or the role should be job share rather then part time. Sharing the role and responsibilities In a part time role one person is responsible to complete the job. When the employee is not in the office the work stops until he/she returns. In a job share arrangement there are two people sharing the responsibilities of one job, which is of a huge benefit to the employee and the employers. When I’m on my day off I can totally switch off because I know my job share partner is on it. My employer knows there is always someone in the office covering the work and the company is getting two brains for the price of one. The work continues as if someone was hired full time. If you’re getting calls on your days off or can’t achieve a deadline without having to working additional days then the role should be job share rather than part time. Continued potential opportunities Part time roles are often limiting to the amount of opportunities presented to the employee. The higher the position and salary generally means a heavier reliance on the employee to achieve the job objectives that cannot be sustained in a part time capacity. In a job share role the job share partners can sustain more impactful, substantial and senior roles. Employers are not disadvantaged as the partners cover the intensity of a five-day week and keep up with the demands of the company. Having two people share one role can create efficiencies by bringing two different or complimentary skillsets increasing the opportunity and likely success of the partnerships performance. You reached a certain level before going on maternity leave so why should you return to a more junior level part time role with a lesser salary and a step back in your career? If you are planning to return to work and requesting...

Read more

How I planned my career for my return to work

How I planned my career for my return to work

A few years ago I started planning to have a baby. My goals were probably a little more unconventional than those of most young women. I concentrated on ensuring I would be of such value to the company they would welcome my request for flexibility when I returned to work. I worked hard and involved myself in every part of the business, even outside my skill set. I formed strong relationships with everyone in the group, from entry level to local senior management, and I built my global management relationships. I worked collaboratively with all departments to create an interdependent working style with me. I strived for promotions and won salary increases based on performance, so that when I came back in a job share role, a pro rata salary would be sufficient to support my family. I built strong networks externally and shared them with my employer, contributing to raising our CSR score by 30% in 12 months. I invested in upskilling and became a vocational education trainer to supplement my income should that be necessary (having first established that there was plenty of casual and part time work in the training industry). Think I’m crazy? One in five mothers report that their roles were made redundant or their departments restructured while they were on maternity leave. The Australian Human Rights Commission reports that 49% of mothers experience discrimination in the workplace at some point. Discrimination in the form of loss of opportunities for further training and career advancement, reduction in pay and conditions, as well as redundancy and job loss, are prevalent. My newsfeed is flooded with articles on the under-representation of women at the C suite level. Australian business has many more Johns than Janes in management, according to OECD figures. I want to help change these statistics and challenge companies to examine what are they doing to facilitate career paths for women. I’ve done everything I can for myself, yet when I search for substantial job share opportunities in my field they are non-existent. I am over-qualified for the part-time roles available. And the few part-time roles for women at my seniority level have requirements that could be achieved only by a full time employee. No wonder skilled and talented women drop out of the workforce. I am challenging corporate Australia to facilitate job share arrangements to keep women in the workforce and – by providing a supportive career path – ensure these women grow and develop into valued employees who are assets for their companies. At Gemini3 we will create, fill and sustain job share...

Read more

Meet the new workforce

Meet the new workforce

The question “What do you do” has become one of the most difficult questions I ever have to answer these days. And it’s not because I’m not doing anything. It’s because I do too much. I am a Brand Consultant/Entrepreneur/Author, someone you would call a Slashie – a new generation on the rise that’s not defined by a singular job title, but by our skill sets, interests and passion. Like a growing number of my peers, I am holding down more than one job – not because I have to, but because I want to. This generation is ditching the 9-5 not because we lack discipline and commitment, but because our ambition and drive urges us to seek more challenges. We are forgoing traditional stable career paths once deemed desirable not because we just want to be different, but because we are determined to forge our own paths and create our own careers. We are educated, confident and hungry to get ahead. Armed with rapidly advancing technology, we are putting in more hard work, juggling more responsibilities and sometimes enjoying less sleep, but are happily reaping the rewards of being more fulfilled, productive and purposeful. We are equipped with multidisciplinary skills from our corporate and entrepreneurial  work that will see us succeeding in the 21st century. The cross-fertilization of skills makes us extremely useful and resourceful in the competitive and ever evolving world of business. Employers are looking for top talents that can bring cut-through, entrepreneurial and innovative thinking to progress their business and keep them ahead of the curve. Investors are looking for entrepreneurs with corporate maturity, who can combine brilliant ideas with discipline and experience to deliver commercial results. There’s a new wave that’s reshaping the workforce. Ask someone today, “What do you do” and their answer is sure to be, “What do you want...

Read more